Longevity

Dear Garden State Trust:

I’m turning 65 this year and thinking about retirement. How long should I plan for?

—Anxious Pre-Retiree

Dear Anxious:

According to the latest data from the National Vital Statistics Reports (August 2017, reporting on 2014 experience), a male age 65 should expect to live 18 more years (to age 83) and a female 20.6 years (to age 85.6). Half of 65-year-olds will die sooner, half later.

That tells us nothing about you, of course. How’s your health? Your family history? You’ll want to take these into account, and you probably should plan for longer than you expect to live.

Here’s another way to look at the numbers from that report. For every 100,000 men, how many reach age 85? 35,518 men do. For every 100,000 women, 49,225 reach age 65. Mortality increases precipitously after that, as shown in the table below.

At AgeMenWomen
7564,06675,495
8051,40764,616
8535,51849,225
9018,649
30,228
956,21412,697
1001,0772,974

Source: National Vital Statistics Report, Volume 66 Number 4, August 14, 2017

Does that help answer your question?

Do you have a question concerning wealth management or trusts? Send your inquiry to contact@gstrustco.com

(July 2018)
© 2018 M.A. Co. All rights reserved.

Here’s to Five More Decades!

Fifty years ago a goal of inclusion for those with special needs was set through the establishment of the Special Olympics, and this year we celebrate getting closer and closer to that goal each year. The community supporting those with special needs grows larger each year ,as well as the community of Special Olympics athletes themselves.

At this point, there are 4.9 million Special Olympics athletes from 172 countries!

Why sports? Their website says it well:

“Through sports, our athletes are seeing themselves for their abilities, not disabilities. Their world is opened with acceptance and understanding. They become confident and empowered by their accomplishments. They are also making new friends, as part of the most inclusive community on the planet — a global community that is growing every day.”

To celebrate, last month the organization put a festival on Soldier Field with celebrities and live entertainment among other events, such as a historical and cultural walk and the first ever Special Olympics Unified Cup.

To see videos that show some of the milestone moments from their history, click here.

Supporting those with special needs.

This has been a real goal in the trust industry, far beyond when “Special Needs Trusts” or “Supplemental Needs Trusts” have been around.

One of the fundamental motivations for creating a trust often can be to create a professionally managed lifetime income stream, for a spouse or child who does not have a way to earn an income stream themselves. When you add into the scenario a case where the person’s needs are greater than average due to disabilities, creating a trust seems like it would be the natural choice.

So… why the distinction of “Special Needs Trust”?

It’s because the usual ways of providing for your loved ones with special needs such as gifting or inheritance may place governmental assistance programs in jeopardy. Many government programs have strict need-based requirements, and if the assets were transferred directly they may end up paying for basic services instead of the quality of life improvements that could be otherwise created by an outside provider.

There are other benefits too, such as the trust being able to be customized to provide the disabled beneficiary’s specific needs, and avoiding family conflict regarding who the caretaker would be.

Special Needs Trusts are complex, so a qualified attorney should be consulted to ensure that they are properly drafted.

Garden State’s trust professionals have years of experience working with special needs trusts. We’re glad that the community that supports those with special needs is growing, that we get to be part of it, and look forward to many more years of increasing inclusion.